Sailboat aground at Emma Schmitz Viewpoint

EDITORS NOTE: Scroll down for updates to this post.

morning, SV Pointless buoy pulled up and she drifted into the rocks at Emma Schmitz View Point.

I know about SV Pointless because she belongs to my husband, aka Beach Drive Blog’s intrepid reporter, Scupper.

It has been gut-wrenching to watch. We are forever grateful to our wonderful neighbors who have stopped by to help and who have sent well wishes.

The Coast Guard will not tow a boat that’s ashore. They were only really interested in protecting life (understandably) and were willing to rescue hubby if needed.

SPD’s crew has to get through the locks before they can do anything – that’s an hour wait. The Seattle Fire Department was the only contact we had and, like the Coast Guard, they will not tow either.

Vessel Assist would not come out because of the small craft advisory.

Over the years, we’ve heard from neighbors who enjoy having SV Pointless as part of their view. It’s been a sign of summer. Let’s hope she can be safely recovered.

UPDATE October 4, 2018:

Photo credit: Pamela K Volkman Garrett

Photo credit: Pamela K Volkman Garrett

S/V Pointless was successfully removed from the shores Emma Schmitz Viewpoint yesterday thanks to Global Salvage and many neighbors and friends, including fine folks from West Seattle Yacht Club.

She is now “on the hard” where she is being surveyed for damage. Scupper and First Mate Pat were aboard for her journey to Ballard and report that there were no noticeable leaks.

I’m sure she will be back for our viewing pleasure next summer OFF the shores of Beach Drive.

Photo credit: Rhonda Porter, unless otherwise noted.

Happening Now at Mee Kwa Mooks

There is a large gathering of motorcyclist at Mee Kwa Mooks park.  Right now, as I write this post, there are about 80 bikes and there are anticipated to be 400 bikes joining the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride. This fundraiser takes place worldwide today.

 

Drill Baby Drill!

Soil samples are now being taken at Emma Schmitz Memorial View Point. According to our intrepid reporter, Scupper, they are going down 60 feet. This is for the upcoming improvements to the deteriorating seawall.

Photo credit: Scupper

Seawall project starting sooner than expected

Construction of the Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook Seawall Project was projected to begin this Fall according to BDB sources from the Army Corp of Engineers. Yet, it appears that construction, ahem, “design” work will commence within a week. This info sign was just installed at the park….


Anticipated impact to neighbors and the public will include drilling/boring equipment taking soil samples from numerous locations along the 450′ stretch of seawall. Constructing the actual wall has been updated to “TBD”.

Sooner the better is my opinion for getting this done. Fall might be too late for the tattered original structure.

From the City of Seattle’s press release:

Soil borings and sampling at Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the City of Seattle, and Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) are collaborating on the Emma Schmitz seawall repair. Together we are ensuring a successful cost-sharing program to restore shoreline protection at Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook in West Seattle. SPR entered into a Project Partnership Agreement with the Corps for the replacement of the seawall. The Corps is responsible for the design of the seawall, and one of the steps in the design process is to take soil borings to inform the final design. Drill equipment will be on site for several days starting the week of June 4.

Built circa 1927, the 450-foot stretch of seawall supports important City and County infrastructure, including a 54-inch sewer main, various Seattle Public Utilities drainage and wastewater lines, and Beach Drive Southwest road. The seawall is badly deteriorated, with a 30 percent chance of failure in the event of severe storm or tidal conditions. The new seawall will be built approximately 2 feet seaward and 2 feet higher than the existing wall, thus significantly improving the grade of this scenic viewpoint for the enjoyment of park users as well as ensuring long-term stability.

The implementation cost of the recommended plan is estimated to be more than $2 million, and will be cost-shared with 65 percent federal funds and 35 percent non-federal funds. The non-federal sponsor, SPR, is responsible for all lands, easements, right-of-ways, relocations, and/or disposal areas which are controlled by the sponsor.

The Corps is designing the seawall, and SPR will be designing the park amenities on top of the wall area. SPR will be holding a public meeting to provide information and gather input on these park amenities.

For more information on the boring and soil collection please visit http://www.nws.usace.army.mil/Missions/Civil-Works/Programs-and-Projects/Projects/Alki-Erosion-Control-Project-Seattle-WA/  or SPR Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook page: http://www.seattle.gov/parks/find/parks/emma-schmitz-memorial-overlook

 

Scupper, reporting for Beach Drive Blog

Buddhist ritual helps crabbing in Area 10

Although I’m not quite sure what the karma penalties would be for catching one of the dungy’s, it was a great sight to see this Taiwanese family repatriating 30 large crabs into Puget Sound.

The grandfather and father of the newborn (on left with mother) carefully remove bands from the claws before releasing the 30 crabs purchased from a local market.

This Buddhist ritual is meant to give good health and wellbeing to the newly born child and create harmony with nature. Pretty cool!

 

Scupper, reporting for Beach Drive Blog

Spongy Grounds by Emma Schmitz View Point

We had some anxious neighbors wanting us to make everyone aware of some changes to the earth in Emma Schmitz View Point. We did encourage them to contact the City of Seattle.

This is at the southern part of where the rock bulkhead and the metal seawall meet. It looks like it could be a possible water line leak? Our intrepid reporter, Scupper, took this photo and commented that the grounds are quite spongy.

UPDATE 9:36 AM:

Scupper talked to Seattle Public Utilities worker who mentioned that the nearby water meter is spinning. He was in the process of contacting Seattle Parks to ask for direction of how to proceed. Apparently the parks department is in control of everything beyond the public sidewalk where there is a park.

This spongy bulge (aka the Beach Drive Bulge) should be resolved soon.

Happy Friday!

We thought you’d enjoy this picture of an early morning musician at Mee Kwa Mooks.

Community Meeting about Lowman Beach Park seawall next Wednesday, May 31, 2017

NEWS RELEASE
Edward B. Murray, Mayor
Jesús Aguirre, Superintendent

For Immediate Release: May 25, 2017
Contact: Karen O’Connor, 206-233-7929
karen.o’connor@seattle.gov

Community invited to Lowman Beach Park seawall meeting

Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) invites the community to the Hall at Fauntleroy at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 31 to learn about the Lowman Beach Park seawall and provide input on design options. The Hall at Fauntleroy is located at 9131 California Ave. SW.

Lowman Beach Park is a neighborhood park on the water located just north of Lincoln Park at 7017 Beach Dr. SW. At this meeting, SPR will present the project background, analysis of the coastal processes (wind, waves, tides, sediment transport/littoral drift) and design options, as well as gather community input.

The Lowman Beach Park seawall is failing and needs to be removed or replaced. As visitors to the park have seen, the existing seawall is slowly falling over towards the water. It is SPR’s goal to remove the remaining seawall and continue the shoreline restoration work that began when the south half of the seawall failed in the mid-1990s.

We hired Environmental Science Associates (ESA) as a design consultant to undertake a feasibility study to look at options for removing the seawall, taking into consideration both the habitat benefits of the seawall removal and the coastal engineering ramifications of that seawall removal. Given the design constraints of the project, it is likely that the existing tennis court will remain in place.

For more information, please visit https://www.seattle.gov/parks/find/parks/lowman-beach-park. If you have questions about the project, or if you need an interpreter or accommodations please contact David Graves, SPR Strategic Advisor, at david.graves@seattle.gov or 206-684-7048.

Emma Schmitz Overlook lower access closed starting next week

Emma Schmitz Overlook’s lower access will be closed starting November 28th through December 9th to replace the rusty old handrails.

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Update: Emma Schmitz Memorial Overlook seawall project

It’s been since December 2014 that the public comment period ended in regard to the Alki Coastal Erosion project spearheaded by the Seattle District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The project outlines a plan to replace a stretch of seawall that precariosly holds back the 50″ diameter sewage pipe that flows around 2 million gallons of wastewater per day.

BartonPumpStation

A representative from the Army Corps Public Affairs Office promptly responded to my inquiry in wondering what the delay was for getting construction started….

“According to our project manager, we received a letter of concurrence from the State Historic Preservation Officer and we sent our feasibility report and appendices to our higher headquarters in Portland June 1 for review and approval. We are now waiting for them to review – if they determine we’ve adequately addressed their comments, then we’ll be ready to get going on the Design and Implementation phase. We are anticipating approval this summer.”

I’m not sure if “approval this summer” will result in any near-term progress. However, I can tell you that the Seattle Parks Department’s truck drivers are getting pretty nervous how the seawall is holding up every time they park near it to backfill the erosion

The newly refinished Barton Pump Station and nearly completed Murray Ave Station won’t do much good if the main artery to the West Point Treatment Plant ruptures due to a collapsing seawall. All of us living down near the beach will know first hand the meaning of “it all rolls downhill”.

 

Scupper, reporting for Beach Drive Blog